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Porter’s attorney “isn’t exactly” on important information – Bega District News

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Federal Minister Christian Porter’s attorney did not provide precise or complete details of critical information discussed with a friend of the woman who accused him of rape, the federal court was told. Michael Hodge QC said in his closing address on Thursday that the evidence Sue Chrysanthou SC provided about the testimony from the November 2020 conference with Jo Dyer was inconsistent and meaningless. This meeting is at the center of Ms. Dyer’s motion to prevent the defamation specialist from representing the former attorney general on his case against the ABC and journalist Louise Milligan. Ms. Dyer said she shared confidential information with Ms. Chrysanthou during their meeting, but the attorney said nothing material was discussed. One claim Ms. Chrysanthou made about what her colleague Matthew Richardson said to her was actually made by someone else, Mr. Hodge said. “He told me that he was worried about me and that his friends were upset or behaving like a cult on the subject and that they would not let go of it and that they would talk to the media and do it very badly for me . “Ms. Chrysanthou told the court on Wednesday. “It’s inherently unlikely … the words she put in his mouth during the cross-examination,” Hodge said. Mr. Richardson arranged the meeting and asked Ms. Chrysanthou to inform Ms. Dyer of a possible libel claim over an article in The Australian. He later emailed her to say that he believed she had a conflict of interest and could not act for Mr. Porter. Christopher Withers SC, silk to Mr Porter, said whether confidential information was being exchanged was the focus of the debate. Assuming there was a decision that was actually confidential, Mr Withers asked how it could be used and said there were many things that had a negative impact on Mr Porter. Ms. Dyer was not a party to the trial and would not necessarily be involved as a witness, Mr. Withers said. However, given that she was mentioned in the plea, there was a high probability that it would occur, Hodge claimed. “There aren’t very many instances where someone is named in a plea and it is said that they are unlikely to be called as a witness,” Hodge said. Mr Withers also argued that there would be an inequality in resources as the qualified attorney had worked on the case for several months and the ABC was given first choice as an attorney. Mr Porter filed a lawsuit against the ABC in March after it published the existence of allegations that he raped a woman in 1988. The woman took her own life last year. Judge Tom Thawley will decide on Thursday afternoon whether Ms. Chrysanthou can continue serving for the Minister for Industry, Science and Technology. Lifeline 13 11 14 beyondblue 1300 22 4636 Australian Associated Press

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Federal Minister Christian Porter’s attorney did not provide precise or complete details of critical information discussed with a friend of the woman who accused him of rape, the federal court was told.

Michael Hodge QC said in his closing address on Thursday that the evidence Sue Chrysanthou SC provided about the testimony from the November 2020 conference with Jo Dyer was inconsistent and meaningless.

That meeting is at the center of Ms. Dyer’s motion to prevent the defamation specialist from representing the former attorney general in his case against the ABC and journalist Louise Milligan.

Ms. Dyer said she shared confidential information with Ms. Chrysanthou during their meeting, but the attorney said nothing material was discussed.

One claim Ms. Chrysanthou made about what her colleague Matthew Richardson said to her was actually made by someone else, Mr. Hodge said.

“He told me that he was worried about me and that his friends were upset or were acting like a cult on the subject and that they would not let go of it and that they would speak to the media and do it very badly for me. “Ms. Chrysanthou told the court on Wednesday.

“It’s inherently unlikely … the words she put in his mouth during the cross-examination,” Hodge said.

Mr. Richardson arranged the meeting and asked Ms. Chrysanthou to advise Ms. Dyer on a possible libel claim over an article in The Australian.

He later emailed her to say that he believed she had a conflict of interest and could not act for Mr. Porter.

Christopher Withers SC, silk to Mr Porter, said whether confidential information was being exchanged was the focus of the debate.

Assuming there was a decision that was actually confidential, Mr Withers asked how it could be used and said there were many things that had a negative impact on Mr Porter.

Ms. Dyer was not a party to the trial and would not necessarily be included as a witness, Mr. Withers said.

However, given that she was mentioned in the plea, there was a high probability that it would occur, Hodge claimed.

“There aren’t very many instances where someone is named in a plea and it is said that they are unlikely to be called as a witness,” Hodge said.

Mr Withers also argued that there would be an inequality in resources as the qualified attorney had worked on the case for several months and the ABC was given first choice as a lawyer.

Mr Porter filed a lawsuit against the ABC in March after it published the existence of allegations that he raped a woman in 1988. The woman took her own life last year.

Judge Tom Thawley will decide on Thursday afternoon whether Ms. Chrysanthou can continue serving for the Minister for Industry, Science and Technology.

Australian Associated Press

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